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Muhammad Anees

Biology and Risk Management in Agriculture, Versailles-Grignon

Durable resistance to wheat leaf rust: adaptive potential of the pathogen



Annual meeting: 2015

Fields-Topics: P3 Population and Ecosystems

Type of talk: Fellows Speed Presentation

Durable resistance to wheat leaf rust: adaptive potential of the pathogen

Biography

I did my Doctorate in the field of Microbial Ecology/Plant Pathology in the University of Burgundy, Dijon, in September 2009 and returned back to Pakistan where I joined Department of Microbiology as an Assistant Professor. From 2010 to 2012, I completed two research projects funded by Higher Education Commission and the Directorate of Science and Technology, Pakistan. The projects were based on the biological control of the indigenous fungal plant diseases. In June 2012, I left Pakistan for Chonnam National University of South Korea for a Post-doctoral study for one year, and then I rejoined the Department of Microbiology, Kohat University of Science and Technology, Kohat, Pakistan. During my Agreeskills fellowship at INRA Grignon, my project was to look for recombination in Puccinia triticina populations causing wheat leaf rust growing in Pakistan. My principal research interest is to work on the fungal diseases of plants/vegetables or crops, and their biological control.

Abstract

Durable resistance to wheat leaf rust: adaptive potential of the pathogen

The title of the present project is Durable resistance to wheat leaf rust: characterization of selective forces shaping the pathogen populations, looking for signs of recombination in Pakistan, a putative centre of origin of the pathogen. The present project is to look for recombination in Puccinia triticina populations causing wheat leaf rust growing in Pakistan, an area close to the supposed centre of origin of the fungus. Another reason for focusing on this area is the recent demonstration of recombination by the host INRA team in the Pakistani population of P. striiformis, a wheat pathogen fungus with a similar biology also considered up to now as reproducing strictly clonally.

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